Corby schoolboy artist's design a hit in Antarctica

Ben Abraham was one of the winners of a competition run by the UK Polar Network (UKPN)

Friday, 10th December 2021, 12:59 pm

A young designer from Corby's work has travelled to one of the most remote places on earth after being selected as a winner in a national competition to design a flag.

Brooke Weston Academy student Ben Abraham beat 169 others to the first prize that saw his design being taken all the way to Antarctica.

UK Polar Network (UKPN) runs the annual contest to find a flag for Antarctica which currently does not have one of its own.

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Ben with his winning design

Ben’s winning design was taken to and photographed on Antarctica, at the Neumayer Research Station, with Olaf Eisen, a glaciologist and geophysicist.

Juliette Smith, head of geography at Brooke Weston Academy, said: "We were so impressed by his design which included the flags of several countries who have signed the Antarctica treaty, we felt that this captured Antarctica as an excellent example of international cooperation.

"Year eight are studying glaciers and cold environments this term, it was also Antarctica Day on December 1, marking 62 years since 12 nations signed the Antarctic treaty, so overall a perfect time for students to enter the competition.

"The geographers needed to create a design which represents the significance of this unique continent which is preserved as a place for peace and scientific discoveries.

Ben’s winning design was taken to and photographed on Antarctica, at the Neumayer Research Station, with Olaf Eisen, a glaciologist and geophysicist.

"Every geographer in Year 8 entered the competition, totalling over 170 entries. The standard of entries was exceptional."

Ben has also received a certificate detailing exactly where his flag had travelled to.

On December 1, 1959, 12 nations signed the Antarctic Treaty, a document declaring that Antarctica would be off limits to military activity and setting it aside as a place for peace and scientific discoveries. Since 2010, December 1 has been celebrated each year to mark this milestone of peace and to inspire future decisions.

SEND teaching assistant, Anikó Toth, who encouraged Ben to enter the competition, said: "I am very proud of Ben and I think this is absolutely amazing."

Ben's design features the flags of countries that have signed the Antarctica treaty,