A Corby mum is swimming the distance of the English Channel to raise awareness of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Rosemary is completing the challenge at Corby Swimming Pool

Rosemary's son Harry (8)
Rosemary's son Harry (8)

A Corby mum is swimming the distance of the English Channel within ten days to raise money for charity and awareness of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Rosemary Reid has spent the last ten months fundraising for the charity Fight for Alfie to support her son Harry, 8, who has Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a life limiting condition which leads to loss of the ability to walk without assistance. It also leads to cardiomyopathy.

Rosemary began her challenge on Monday (June 20) and is planning to be finished on Wednesday (June 29).

The challenge has been taking place at Corby International Pool for three hours each night.

Rosemary is swimming the shortest point of the Channel, doing just over two miles – or 141 lengths – a day.

Rosemary said: “My motivation is to help Harry and other boys and girls with Duchenne, a life limiting condition that will result in an early grave and complete paralysis starting with the loss of the ability to walk.”

Harry was unexpectedly diagnosed with the disorder at age six.

Rosemary said: “There are still no words to describe the pain that we feel as a family and knowing what the future holds for Harry.

“The day of the diagnosis will haunt me forever, the words of the doctor and the booklet to bring home and read.

“The worst part of it is knowing as a mother that there is no cure and that only by giving Harry steroids can I slow down the progression of this monstrous illness but only by a matter of months.

“I will never be able to put my arms around Harry and tell him that it will be okay. That the only future for Harry is one of endless medical tests, operations and interventions. My world is still full of panic and fear.“

Fight for Alfie is a charity whose main purpose is to fund the fight against Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. All funds raised further the research and study into Duchenne to find a cure.

The money raised has gone to fund a study into a possible new treatment, set up by the charity Fight for Alfie, of which her son is part of.

The project: Project Care for the Rare, will provide therapeutic treatment to several boys from across the globe with the intention of slowing down DMD.

To date, Rosemary has climbed Snowdon, box jumped the height of the Empire State building, for which she was trained by Corby gym owner Dan Good, and has now begun her attempt to swim the distance of the English Channel within ten days.

In doing this, Rosemary has been able to raise about £30,000.

Rosemary said: "The fundraising has brought me back to life and given me something to fight for.

"Duchenne is an awful genetic condition and more needs to be done to raise awareness and find new treatments for children with the condition.

“Everyone has really helped and supported us in our fundraising efforts this year. A special thanks to Lucy, my wonderful 10 year old daughter who does so much for her brother too.”

If you would like to donate, visit Rosemary’s JustGiving page.