KGH shortlisted for two national awards

Emma Collison-Ani, Louise Hyde, Julie Fosbrook and Naomi Fleming from KGH
Emma Collison-Ani, Louise Hyde, Julie Fosbrook and Naomi Fleming from KGH

Kettering General Hospital has been shortlisted for two national awards for the way it has encouraged staff to use antibiotics in the best possible way.

Micro-organisms which are resistant to antibiotics are a growing national and international threat and contribute to 5,000 deaths per year in the UK.

To prevent this there are now widespread national and international campaigns across healthcare to encourage the appropriate use of the drugs.

The 2018 Antibiotic Guardian Awards, arranged by Public Health England, were set up to recognise the local, regional and national contributions to tackling antimicrobial resistance.

KGH has been shortlisted in the prescribing and stewardship category for the way it has implemented a new way of managing patients who suffer from cellulitis – a common bacterial skin infection.

The hospital’s new antibiotic pathway for cellulitis ensures, where appropriate, that patients are prescribed oral antibiotics rather than IV antibiotics when they leave hospital.

This helps to preserve IV antibiotics for the most resistant and serious infections and reduces the risk of bacteria developing resistance to them.

KGH’s antimicrobial clinical technician Julie Fosbrook has also been shortlisted for the Das Pillay Award for up and coming stewardship champions which recognises junior doctors, nurses and pharmacists who have excelled in delivering antimicrobial stewardship quality improvements.

She was nominated for the award because of the way she helped develop a antibiotic App for mobile phones in March 2018 which helps doctors and nurses to swiftly check exactly which antibiotics to prescribe, in what dose and in what way – for example in tablet form, IV, or liquid.

Also for her work in education and training.

Antimicrobial pharmacist Naomi Fleming said: “We are delighted to have been shortlisted for these national awards in recognition of the hard work our team has put into the fight against antibiotic resistance.

“The appropriate use of antibiotics is something all of us should be aware of.

“In hospital we are carrying out continuing initiatives to keep awareness of appropriate use at the top of our staff’s agenda.

“Local people can also do their bit by using antibiotics only as prescribed.”

Judging and presentation of the awards takes place in London on June 27.

Antibiotics are important medicines for treating bacterial infections in both humans and animals.

However, bacteria can adapt and find ways to survive the effects of an antibiotic.

This means antibiotics are losing their effectiveness at an increasing rate and the more we use antibiotics, the greater the chance bacteria will become resistant to them and they can no longer be used to treat infections.

Appropriate use of antibiotics by local people includes:

- Always take your antibiotics as prescribed and at the right intervals

- Don’t skip doses

- Don’t ‘save some for later’

- Don’t share antibiotics with others