Wellingborough mum appeals against deportation to Ghana

A Wellingborough mother who is a member of a local church is facing deportation to Ghana after being accused by the Home Office of being an illegal immigrant for six years
A Wellingborough mother who is a member of a local church is facing deportation to Ghana after being accused by the Home Office of being an illegal immigrant for six years

A Wellingborough mother who is a member of a local church is facing deportation to Ghana after being accused by the Home Office of being an illegal immigrant for six years.

Gloria Nuerkie Allotey, of Lister Road, Wellingborough, told Birmingham Immigration and Asylum Tribunal she was an active member at Harvester’s Chapel in Cleeve Way, Wellingborough, and wanted to stay in the town.

Mrs Allotey was appealing, on a human rights basis, against a Home Office decision to deport her back to Ghana where her husband at present lives.

A Home Office official told tribunal judge David Borgada that Mrs Allotey came to the UK in 2005 but her visa expired six years ago.

The official, who did not want her name published, said: “You have had no legal right to be here for the past six years so why did you not make an application straight away to extend your stay knowing you faced deportation?”

Mrs Allotey, who has a daughter living with her, said she did not apply because she wanted to have more children here.

She said: “They expected me, in Ghana, to have more children.

“Unfortunately I had two miscarriages and needed hospital treatment.

“My daughter, who is under 18, and I are now living with a friend in Wellingborough and we are members of Harvester’s Chapel.”

Asked by the official how she was looking after herself, Mrs Allotey replied: “Church members are helping us in return for me doing things for them.”

Mrs Allotey also said the friend she was living with was helping her financially.

Her friend confirmed she helped to look after Mrs Allotey and gave her money.

The official said she saw no reason to change the Home Office’s deportation decision and urged Mr Borgada to dismiss the appeal.

She said Mrs Allotey’s daughter could also go with her.

Mr Bogada said, however, there might have to be a separate application for the daughter to remain in the UK.

The official then reminded Mrs Allotey her daughter could apply for a British citizens passport to stay in this country.

Mrs Allotey said: “My daughter and I have a full life in Wellingborough and my daughter loves it here.

“She would not be able to re-adapt to a new life in Ghana.

“Our human rights should be considered.”

Mr Borgada said he would make a decision at a later date.