Stepping out for the first Wellingborough & District Memory Walk

The memory walk is taking place on Sunday (October 1)
The memory walk is taking place on Sunday (October 1)

People of all ages are invited to take part in the first Wellingborough & District Memory Walk.

The event this weekend is being held to raise awareness and funding for the Alzheimer’s Society.

It is the first event of its kind in Wellingborough

It is the first event of its kind in Wellingborough

It is hoped that the short walk, which is open to all, will evoke memories of bygone years as the route takes in some of the most interesting areas of the town.

The walk starts at 11am on Sunday (October 1) at Wellingborough Museum in Castle Way and finishes at Bassett’s Park.

The walk is due to be opened by Wellingborough mayor Cllr Paul Bell and closed by deputy mayor Cllr Malcolm Waters.

Caroline Benham from Bright Copper Kettles said: “This is the first Wellingborough & District Memory Walk, and if successful, it is hoped that it will be an annual event.

“Bright Copper Kettles C.I.C. is supporting the event, which was sparked by Cllr Jonathan Ekins.

“We are hoping to raise £1,000 for Alzheimer’s Society with the help of everyone taking part in the walk.

“The walk is 1.5 miles, it is recognised that this will be a challenge for many of the participants and it is hoped that people will collect sponsors for their efforts.

“The walk is open to all ages and abilities, and we would particularly like to see people with dementia included in our walk.”

Caroline said the route is wheelchair friendly, but part of the route is uphill along Sheep Street and Silver Street.

Anyone who may find this walk too long is welcome to arrange pick-ups part-way along the route and rejoin the group at Bassett’s Park.

As a social enterprise, Bright Copper Kettles C.I.C. uses profits to support older people, including those with dementia, to become more involved in their local community.

Their membership packs support their members, with inspiration and information, to provide activity opportunities for older people as well as raising money to support their aims locally. ​

They also sell related products on their website to raise further funding for future projects.

​These purchases help improve the lives of older people, including those with dementia.