Homes on iron age site in Irthlingborough approved

The plans were approved subject to some conditions imposed by the council's planning committee.
The plans were approved subject to some conditions imposed by the council's planning committee.

Plans have been approved for 88 homes on part of a historic Iron Age site in Irthlingborough.

The developer of the homes in Attley Way has said it will make a feature and put up information boards about Crow Hill – the remains of an Iron Age hill fort thought to have been part of a river traffic management system for the River Nene.

At a meeting on August 21 East Northamptonshire Council’s planning committee approved the scheme, which comes after 100 homes were approved as part of the development in February.

The permission for the development, which will include 10 affordable homes, is subject to some waste management and additional parking issues being resolved.

Draft minutes of the meeting say: “During debate on the application, members acknowledged that this application was an improvement on the original plans but they had concerns about parking on the development, particularly the use of tandem parking and that the neighbouring medical centre was very busy and service users often parked on the highway.

“It was noted that three parking places were planned by the turning arc and it was suggested that the applicant could possibly look at putting in more to help alleviate the parking issues. There was also concern how waste vehicles would use the shared surface, particularly when reversing.”

The site is close to the NHS Nene Park outpatients clinic which opened in 2011 and the Aldi store which opened last year.

Local tribes stationed at Crow Hill fort and in conjunction with Hunsbury Hill and Thrapston hill forts controlled about 40km of the River Nene.

Over the years a large amount of iron pottery has been found at Crow Hill which experts say suggest it was heavily occupied.