Corby waste plant campaigners vow to keep on protesting

Residents from across Corby have vowed to keep campaigning to stop the town being turned into a dumping ground
Residents from across Corby have vowed to keep campaigning to stop the town being turned into a dumping ground

Residents from across Corby have vowed to keep campaigning to stop the town being turned into a dumping ground.

They are planning a series of peaceful protests against a decision to extend the catchment area from which waste can be brought to a controversial waste gasification plant planned for the outskirts of the town.

At a meeting attended by more than 100 people on Tuesday, Corby councillor Rob McKellar and representatives from a local campaign group against the plant, which will be built in Gretton Brook Road, recruited dozens of people to join a new organising committee to co-ordinate the protests.

Cllr McKellar, who is bringing a legal challenge against the waste plant, told the meeting: “We need to attack this from two angles.

“We will use a Judicial Review to challenge the change to the catchment area in court, but the protests are just as important. We need to show the developers that trying to turn Corby into the nation’s dumping ground will do so much damage to their reputation it really isn’t worth their while.”

Campaigners are expected to hold demonstrations outside the Corby Cube, County Hall in Northampton and near to the proposed site of the waste plant.

Speaking after the meeting, Cllr McKellar said: “This is an issue of massive local concern and which affects every single one of us.

“Corby and its surrounding villages deserve better than to have waste imposed on us from miles around. Working together we can beat this waste plant.”

Lee Forster, who is camping at the site of the proposed plant in protest at the plans, has been served with an eviction notice by solicitors acting for Gretton Brook Estates.

His partner, Corinna Milligan, said: “He refused to accept the eviction letter so the solicitor stuck it on the railings. Lee isn’t moving. He has been overwhelmed by the level of support he’s had for his protest.”

Developer Drenl said the plant needed a bigger catchment area to make it viable.