Scottish referendum poses tricky questions

The Scottish independence referendum fought for by Alex Salmond raises a lot of questions, says Neil
The Scottish independence referendum fought for by Alex Salmond raises a lot of questions, says Neil
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This nation, and county, faces a fascinating nine months as we hear the arguments and debates that will culminate in the referendum on Scottish independence in September.

Debates about whether the 800,000 Scots or their descendants living in other parts of the UK should have a say have already been resolved.

Whether you agree or not, the Scottish Government opposed the move because it would greatly increase the complexity of the referendum and cited evidence from the United Nations that a referendum based on criteria other than residence would be queried by other nations.

I myself have Scottish grandparents, but was born and bred in England. I do not deserve a vote in the referendum.

But what this issue does is prompt the inveitable questions about nationality and what it means to be Scottish.

The Scottish Government intends to extend automatic Scottish citizenship to all British citizens who are “habitually resident” in Scotland, and to British citizens born in Scotland, even if they already hold dual citizenship with another country.

So where does this leave those living in Corby and the rest of the county and nation who were not born north of the border, but are of Scottish descent?

Do those born of Scottish parents in Corby or elsewhere in Northamptonshire lose the right to describe themselves as Scotsmen or women, even though they could represent that country at sporting events?

Just one of the many tricky independence questions still to be answered.

Neil Pickford, Editor

@NeilPickfordNT