Letters: Road design to blame for ‘toxic’ adverse camber

David Simmons says bad road design is to blame for the A6's poor safety record
David Simmons says bad road design is to blame for the A6's poor safety record
0
Have your say

I read in your November 6 edition how the A6 between Kettering and Rushden is one of the county’s most dangerous roads.

I usually drive along this road several times a week, and there is one point where I have witnessed the aftermath of a number of accidents, one of them, I recall, where a car was parked on its roof.

That point in question is between the second and third bends at the end of the Burton Latimer by-pass coming from Barton Seagrave.

The bend at the end of the by-pass is benign.

However, the next one, a left bend, is “toxic”, because it has an adverse camber on the road.

The remaining four bends before the roundabout is reached all seem to have constant radii, and so shouldn’t present a particular problem.

The blame for the “toxic “ bend would seem to belong to the original road designers, and also to the current organisation tasked with looking after that road, for failing to, in these cash-strapped times, put up two warning signs, or at the very least one, for the traffic that is negotiating the inside of the bend on their way south-east.

DAVID SIMMONS

Kettering

We pay far too much in overseas aid

I have just been reading how my tax has been spent for the tax year 2013 to 2014.

Someone at Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs thought it would be a good idea to outline where your money, if you happen to be a UK tax payer goes?

Housing, utilities and street lights is mentioned.

Don’t we already pay council tax to the local authority for the provision of these items?

It seems to me that we are being charged twice!

Overseas aid. Who from overseas benefits from our multi-billion pound overseas aid budget?

I believe India and Pakistan are the two biggest beneficiaries? Both these countries are “nuclear powers”, and with India having its own space programme!

Obviously there are some very poor people in both these countries that need looking after.

However, it should not be down to the British tax payer to look after these people, but the governments of India and Pakistan respectively.

If both these countries were to spend less on defence then perhaps the poorer people in both countries would benefit enormously?

This would then leave more money to be diverted to our welfare budget to look after our own sick, frail and elderly population.

IVAN HUMPHREY

Kettering

Future of the NHS is too important

“Dealing with the Devil” was a comment made by UKIP leader, Nigel Farage, after their recent by-election win.

That comment tells us he is prepared to do a deal with whoever it is that will give him what he wants, whatever the ongoing consequences.

I can’t help but ask what, and who, will be sacrificed to achieve his aims?

He is already on video voicing his opinion that the National Health Service should be funded by private insurance.

To be clear, I voted UKIP in the last European elections as I felt there was a need to kick our Government and opposition up the backside.

This needed to be done.

I feel we should leave the European Union.

I still do.

I hope Labour will eventually decide to have a referendum on the European Union, but I am not prepared to put our NHS in danger with a vote for the Conservatives or UKIP that could put both in power in 2015.

The NHS is too important to be put at peril just because I want out of Europe.

Some things are more important than party politics.

RAY RODDEN

Corby

Concert was such a great success

On behalf of Rowell and Desborough Lions, can I thank Corby Silver Band and a Handful of Harmonies for their wonderful concert at Rothwell Parish Church recently.

Thanks to everyone that supported the event, we raised £500 for the air ambulance and the RNLI.

For all those who enjoyed the evening, we are holding the next one on December 12, 2015.

Can I also thank Canon John Westwood for allowing us to use such a wonderful venue.

SIMON OGLE

Secretary of Rowell and Desborough Lions

Some ups and downs on buses

I write regarding the recent changes to bus routes in the Finedon and Irthlingborough areas, where there is now inconvenience, as well as improvements to services.
Sadly, the revamped 45 service no longer includes Finedon, so there is no longer a link to Crow Hill or Pinetrees estates in Irthlingborough.

However, both estates now have a link and a half-hourly service to Wellingborough, with most services running to the Berrymoor area.

Here in Finedon the 45 has been replaced with the X1, but necessitates a walk to Burton Road or Wellingborough Road to use it as those at the Irthlingborough end of Finedon have to do, because the Allen Road stops are not used.

The added bonus is that the X1 bound for Corby gives a half hourly service to Kettering General Hospital, and Wellingborough bound we still have a half-hourly service, despite the loss of the 45.

I suppose now, in having four buses an hour to and from Kettering, it is an improvement, despite some former stops no longer being used, and in having to use two buses each way to or from Crow Hill or Pinetrees, those with free passes are more advantaged than those fare paying pasengers with extra expense.

STELLA STEVENSON

Finedon

How are we going to feel safe?

We are going to see a large reduction in our Police Community Support Officers and police covering the same areas.

So, my question is, how are the police going to make us feel safe and secure?

RAY LILLEY

Corby

Coffee morning raised large sum

I would like to thank everyone who came along and supported us when we took part in the World’s Biggest Coffee Morning in September. The total raised was £1,096. With Gift Aid the final total will be £1,152.

A big thank you to all who helped on the day, to those who contributed to the stalls and all who were unable to attend, but sent donations.

LESLEY CASWELL and BERYL WETHERALL

Rushton

Christmas must be about Christ

The only way anyone can enter the created universe is by conception and birth.

What is true for us is also true for God. This is what the theologians call “The Incarnation” – the taking on of the flesh.

God becomes as we are so that we might become as He is.

There is certainly a need for a transformation in our humanity when we read St Luke’s account of the birth of Christ.

Here was a world that had no space for a woman about to give birth and could only find an animal’s feeding trough for a cradle.

The new born child was wrapped in strips of cloth to keep out the chilly night air and the news of his arrival into this world was made known to the rough and irreligious shepherds and not to those who walked in the corridors of power.

The work that Jesus came to do in God’s name began at the moment of his birth.

The reality of human indifference had been exposed as there was no room in the inn for the holy family.

It is the apathy in our humanity that is challenged in the celebration of Christmas; why did God come in the first place?

The festival of Christmas for us is to make sure that Christ is in our Christmas celebrations and not some sort of a vague X Factor that stops us seeing beyond the tinsel and the turkey, the mistletoe and the mince pies!

At the heart of Christmas is a person who loves us and wants the very best for us.

He is the very best Christmas present we could ever have.

We can have that present in our own hearts and lives when we allow him to transform our apathy and despair into action for goodness and the seeking of the welfare for others.

One of the secrets of a happy Christmas is to give a present to someone who is not able to say thank you to your face but will know the reality of thanksgiving in their hearts.

Let’s put Christ back into Christmas and sing more joyfully with the angels at the birth of our Saviour.

CANON GEORGE BURGON

Barton Seagrave

Mindful of our country’s culture

Britain has been used as a safety valve for the unemployed in Europe for decades to the point where we are now swamped and no longer know exactly how many immigrants there actually are in this country.

Or if we do know, the government is keeping it from us.

Corby is becoming inundated with immigrants, and I would not mind betting we are well above any quota laid down by our Government.

Angela Merkel told David Cameron “abide by our rules or get out of the EU”. Does Merkel speak for all Europe?

Britain’s major problems result from debt, this debt persists not helped by the fact we pay the European Union some £55m a day.

We could clear the national debt in just one year by leaving the EU, dump the Draconian rules and legislation and bring back the ten bob note and fish and chips, feet and inches, gallons and pints in one fell swoop.

Exchange of workers in a controlled fashion like America and Australia is what we need.

Here in Corby, known for our generosity, we will slowly see our traditions washed away by cultures who refuse to speak our language or accept our culture.

They have paid nothing into the system but rely on it from day one, in Germany you have to “pay in” before you can claim a penny from Mrs Merkel.

Not liking “too many” immigrants in your country does not make you a racist.

It makes you mindful of preserving your tradition and culture just in the same way European countries do.

We should pull out now and let the EU deal with its own unemployed, and its inability to boost its economies like Britain does.

TOM BINGHAM

Corby