Disgusted at attitude of shop’s boss

Tracey Reeve was disgusted at the attitude of one shop area manager towards unsold turkeys before Christmas
Tracey Reeve was disgusted at the attitude of one shop area manager towards unsold turkeys before Christmas
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I would like to say how disgusted I am with one supermarket area manager.

Last year, the old manager put all the turkeys down to £5 at a certain time on Christmas Eve and you could be sure they would all be sold, leaving nothing to bin after closing.

This year was a different matter.

We went to buy a turkey or a crown (whichever was cheapest) and they were all 50 per cent off – which is good enough.

When I asked the young man who was marking them down if they would be reduced any more due to closing in an hour or so, the lad then said he had asked the area manager, who said no.

He had said they would all stay at 50 per cent and all that were left would be binned.

It was Christmas and you need to sell the fresh food or you will bin it at the end of the day.

The boss may not care, but at the time I was in there there were boxes upon boxes of turkeys which they couldn’t fit on the shelves.

I would say at least 50 or 60 whole turkeys and at least 200 or 300 crowns.

What a waste of food that others could have used.

For example, the charities that rely on us to donate food so less fortunate people can have a Christmas dinner, the elderly or homeless.

Because of one person’s greed all that food has been binned.

It wasn’t the company itself but the area manager.

Even the staff couldn’t understand why they couldn’t sell them and the fresh produce for even 10p.

At least that way it will get used by people who need it.

If nothing else, then give the unsold products to the food banks.

I don’t know who this area manager is, but he or she should be ashamed of themselves right now.

TRACEY REEVE

By email

Estimates are on the low side

So, it appears the latest estimates of Romanian and Bulgarian immigration flows to the UK are dramatically underpowered.

The alarming report by The Democracy Institute, a politically independent public policy research organisation, highlights the true scale of migrant influx, examines the causes, and proposes a policy-based solution for European leaders.

Its model projects that, over the next five years, at least 385,000 migrants will move from Bulgaria and Romania to the UK.

This is much higher than previous independent estimates.

That’s an annual average of at least 77,000 additional migrants.

UKIP opposition to further mass immigration has nothing to do with race or religion, it is opposed to mass immigration because the numbers are too great and the skills the people bring are not sufficient for our economy.

We were told pre-2004 only 13,000 people a year would come to the UK, experience has taught us the real number was much higher.

If 385,000 people from Romania and Bulgaria, as estimated by The Democracy Institute, actually come to the UK it will put unbearable pressure on our health, welfare, and education system.

It will also make getting a job much harder for our one million unemployed young people.

This is economically and politically unacceptable.

Until now David Cameron has been all talk and no action.

UKIP is calling on the Government to contradict EU law and unilaterally block free labour market access in the UK to Romanian and Bulgarian immigrants.

This is the only viable and effective solution to a quickly approaching problem.

DEREK CLARK and ROGER HELMER

UKIP MEPs for the East Midlands

Imagination is needed in towns

Re Editor’s opinion on December 26. You are quite correct in stating that the demise of town centres is, in part, due to the development of out-of-town retail centres.

I also entirely agree that we cannot turn back the clock.

This is not a phenomenon peculiar to Kettering but I wonder what the visitor to Kettering will think of our town in 2014:

The football stadium, with no football club.

The multi-million-pound market place, with no market.

The “pedestrianised“ town centre, which isn’t truly fully pedestrianised.

The town centre, with no public toilets.

If it is town hall officials who have contributed to the decline of the town centre over recent years, then maybe this is the time for them to do something creative about revitalising it?

DICK FROST

Kettering

Time to get tough on the burglars

When someone breaks into your home they take away your self worth.

They don’t care who you are or if you have worked hard for everything you have.

They take personal possessions that break people’s hearts.

Until the law changes, it will not distract them.

It’s about time Britain had a get tough attitude.

Until burglary happens to the burglar, or their family, they’ll never understand how much it hurts!

People who get sentenced don’t care as some have a better life in prison than their life and home on the outside.

NAME AND ADDRESS SUPPLIED

By email

Support for an East-West link

It is encouraging that the necessity of our national interest to cut our dependency on fuel and reduce associated costs is translating to support for East West Rail in full, with Oxford-Bedford-Cambridge looking more relevant and positive.

The Bedfordshire Railway and Transport Association, like some others, believes and remains of the opinion that Thameslink and East West have overlapping shared interest and where that occurs, then they should work together.

We believe Northampton-Bedford should be retained as a complementary option for both schemes.

The association is a long-established local-regionally based voluntary group advocating remedial short but strategic rail infrastructure projects.

In particular, our key areas of focus include supporting the extension of Thameslink from Bedford to Northampton, clearing through tracks at Bedford for other services, offering a joined-up rail service between Gatwick, London, Luton, Bedford, Ampthill for the new Center Parcs, Brackmills International Freight and Logistics BID Hub, Rugby, Coventry and Birmingham.

We also support the East West Rail Consortium’s bid, following go-ahead for Oxford-Bletchley-Bedford, towards the East Coast Main Line (ECML) and onwards to Cambridge for Greater East Anglia, Norwich, Ipswich, Great Yarmouth and Felixstowe and vice versa.

We believe there is a case to suggest Northampton to Bedford would allow more freight by rail from East Coast ports and even on existing routes, due to a lack of cross-country rail options.

Passenger-wise, the case for the Bedford to Northampton line enhances all cases and capacities and at just 20 miles, could be done with Bedford-Cambridge well ahead, and at the fraction of the cost of HS2 or A14 widening.

There is fuel saved to domestic drivers commuting to existing town centre stations by virtue of out of town access to stations with decent parking like Brackmills and Olney, parking and congestion in urban cordons and exposure to airborne contaminates like benzenes, Co2 and Sulphur Dioxide for example.

The personal health benefits of reducing that to families and communities is surely worth more than just money or parochial short-term expediency.

RICHARD PILL

BRTA Campaigns Officer

Group is here to help with SADS

I was saddened to read of the sudden death of Father Joseph Williams at the age of 42.

Our thoughts are with his family and all who knew Father Joseph.

SADS UK is often contacted by people whose lives have been shattered when a seemingly healthy person dies so unexpectedly and no cause of death can be found post-mortem.

SADS UK offers information and support to families who have been affected.

The charity has six medical advisors who are specialists with regard to Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome, which occurs more often than is generally recognised and people from all walks of life are affected.

For further information contact SADS UK on 01277 811215, email info@sadsuk.org.

ANDREA PATIENT

SADS UK

Best burglars are evading capture

I was interested to read your headline article that the 20 worst burglars in the county had been caught.

Presumably the 20 best burglars were too clever to be caught!

BOB KING

Rushton

Memories of the unique park treat

My dad used to make the ice cream at Wicksteed at the factory at the end of the playground. I used to help make the orange lollies with him.

The ice cream was made in large tins which were recycled at the end of each day.

I worked in the shops and the tins were sharp at the edges and we would cut our hands .

It was a summer holiday job at 16p an hour.

ANGELA STEELE

By email