Woodland scheme launched at Corby climate change forum

From left,  Rutendo Nyatsine of Zimwomen, founder of Planet Aid UK Birgit Soe, Elizabeth Adongo of Corby Community Food Co-op and woodland campaigner Barry Nichol
From left, Rutendo Nyatsine of Zimwomen, founder of Planet Aid UK Birgit Soe, Elizabeth Adongo of Corby Community Food Co-op and woodland campaigner Barry Nichol

A woodland project was launched at a one-day event in Corby aimed at highlighting the effect of climate change at home and around the world.

Planet Aid UK, the Corby-based not-for-profit company, held the event at the Cube on Thursday, September 26, as part of Humana People to People Day.

It was one of a number of events which took place in 17 European countries on the theme Our Climate, Our Challenge.

To keep climate change on the agenda in the Corby area Plant Aid UK is planning to plant 500 trees.

A site has been located on farmland near the town and already 40 groups and individuals have signed up to take part in the project.

Mark Buswell, Planet Aid promoter, said: “The day went very well and we were pleased with the turnout and the interest shown in the woodland scheme.

“Speakers on the day demonstrated that climate change is not just a problem for other people, but an issue for all of us. Whether it is the poorest communities overseas, or at home, we are all affected.”

The Corby event include a short documentary film highlighting the effects of climate change around the world, keynote speeches, a workshop by Green World Recycling and a number of displays.

Among the groups which attended were Electric Corby, Corby Community Food Co-op and the Zimwomen Association, a group with members from all over the county which works to empower women, young people and children.

As well as supporting aid projects in Africa, the group also runs health, craft, textile-printing and drumming and dancing sessions.

Rutendo Nyatsine, a member of the group, said: “Materials we take to our projects in Uganda and Zimbabwe are recycled to make goods such as jewellery which can then be sold. Water pumps and new ovens are giving women time to do this.”

Planet Aid UK was launched in 1998 and moved from Roade to Corby in 2000.

It is a member of the international Humana People to People movement which runs more than 470 aid projects in 44 countries across the world.

Unwanted items are collected in 1,470 clothing banks around the UK and are sorted in a warehouse in Corby and another in Devon.

Profits from the sale of clothing go towards financing environmental, educational and farming projects in India and Africa.