Wellingborough pub named cider and perry pub of 2014

Northants Camra chairman Ian MacAulay presents the cider and perry pub of the year award to John Eames of the Coach and Horses in Wellingborough
Northants Camra chairman Ian MacAulay presents the cider and perry pub of the year award to John Eames of the Coach and Horses in Wellingborough

A pub in Wellingborough has been awarded a top honour.

The Coach and Horses in Wellingborough has been named the Campaign for Real Ale (Camra) cider and perry pub of the year for Northamptonshire.

The pub, in Oxford Street, sells 16 real ciders and perries, along with an ever-changing selection of real ales.

General manager John Eames said: “We’re really pleased to win this award.

“We sell 16 craft ciders and perries on a rotational basis including Westons and Saxby’s, which is a good old Wellingborough name.

“We have a good mix of strengths from 4.5 per cent to 8.5 per cent and a mix of dry through to sweet to please everyone.

“Craft cider is definitely getting more popular and it does particularly well in the summer. A lot of women like it and a lot of people who like craft beer also like craft cider, but I’m not sure you’ll convert a real ale drinker into a cider drinker.”

Mr Eames and his team at the Coach and Horses are no strangers to awards and are hoping to win the pub of the year award again. Mr Eames said: “We won Northamptonshire Pub of the Year in 2011 and would love to win it again. That’s what we’re working hard to achieve, but there is a lot of stiff competition out there.

“I think people are starting to go back to wanting good old British pubs that sell honest, traditional British pub food. People have tried wine bars and things, and now are missing British pubs.

“Our food is also popular. We sell six different types of pies and are looking to introduce another 10 because a pie and a pint always goes well together.”

Cider is made from apple juice, either fresh or concentrate, and perry from the juice of pears.

In law cider must contain at least 35 per cent apple juice, but Camra insists that “real” cider must be made of at least 90 per cent fresh apple juice.

More cider is drunk in the UK than anywhere else in the world.