Slideshow: Lights out to remember war fallen

Lights were switched off across the county last night to mark the hour Britain entered the First World War 100 years ago.

Candles were lit for a time of reflection on the anniversary of this country going to war.

Centenary Commemoration: Kettering: Service at the cenotaph. Kettering RBL service of commemoration of the 100 year anniversary of the declaration of war with Germany. Lights Out service . Andy Smith (chairman of Kettering RBL) Monday 4th August 2014 NNL-140508-004346009

Centenary Commemoration: Kettering: Service at the cenotaph. Kettering RBL service of commemoration of the 100 year anniversary of the declaration of war with Germany. Lights Out service . Andy Smith (chairman of Kettering RBL) Monday 4th August 2014 NNL-140508-004346009

Groups, clubs, businesses and individuals were encouraged to support the Lights Out event taking place between 10pm and 11pm.

Royal British Legion branches both locally and nationally organised events, which were held at the same time as a candlelit vigil at Westminster Abbey.

The Kettering branch held a short service to commemorate the outbreak of war, at Kettering War Memorial in Sheep Street, with about 180 people attending.

One of the organisers, Andy Smith of the town’s branch of the Royal British Legion, who also acted as standard bearer for the service, said he had only been expecting 20 to 30 people, and had printed just 40 orders of service “to be on the safe side.”

Mr Smith added: “It was absolutely amazing, I can’t describe how I felt at the time. It was quite moving. I felt the hairs on the back of my neck.

“We had two people who were reminiscing about their great-uncle who signed up on that same night and the next week he was killed.”

There were also events in towns and villages including Corby, Rushden, Burton Latimer, Titchmarsh and Geddington.

Military cadets were among the attendees at the ceremony at the war memorial in Corby old village. Kev Ritchie, commanding officer of the 422 (Corby) Squadron Royal Air Force Air Cadets, said: “It was a poignant moment remembering all the soldiers who lost their lives.

“But the feeling was also quite good in a way because it brought the town together.”