Pupils work to put across one punch lesson

Stacey Watt, Josh Crayford, Kane D'Souza, Vinay Mulgi, Rosie Watts and Maria Gent pictured with their design for a poster to promote the One Punch One Life campaign at Weavers School in Wellingborough.
Stacey Watt, Josh Crayford, Kane D'Souza, Vinay Mulgi, Rosie Watts and Maria Gent pictured with their design for a poster to promote the One Punch One Life campaign at Weavers School in Wellingborough.
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Pupils at a town school have been getting creative for a contest which asks them to devise a way to put across the message that one punch can ruin lives.

Youngsters in Year 9 at Weavers School in Wellingborough have been getting to work on their entries for the County Schools Challenge.

The initiative is based on the story of Stuart Martin, 28, who was punched in the back of the head outside Bar Life nightclub in Wellingborough in 2010. The single punch ruptured an artery in his neck and killed him.

Mr Martin’s fiancee Katie Harthen and mother Joyce Martin have spoken about the effect the tragedy has had for the four minute film One Punch One Life, which is being shown in schools across the county which are taking part in the project.

The challenge to pupils is to come up with their own creative way of conveying this message.

Pupils at Weavers School said they had been surprised to learn from the film that one punch was enough to kill.

Pupil Josh Cayford said: “I saw the flowers down town and wasn’t sure what it was about but now I know more about it.

“I think the film is a good way to tell people about what people can do when they are in town and to be aware of what people can do.”

Josh said some of the ideas his team were thinking about included creating logos and posters.

Pupil Rosie Watts said: “I was quite shocked how just one punch could kill someone. I never thought such a small action could result in someone’s life being taken. People need to know because if they are out late at night, a bit drunk, they might not be aware of what they are doing and it could have serious consequences.”

Dan Gay, pastoral director at the school, said pupils had already come up with some good ideas for their projects.

He said: “They have got some really imaginative, original ideas – it’s not just a project, it’s about changing the way people inside and outside schools think about issues. One punch is a very simple thing that has changed the lives of so many people.”

The County Schools Challenge is being run by police, the fire service, the Arson Taskforce, Connexions and Northamptonshire Education and Work Service. It will culminate in a grand final where teams whose ideas are chosen as best in their school will pit their projects against those by teams from other schools.