GENERAL ELECTION 2015: Everything you need to know about the election...in numbers

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Here are some of the key statistics from the General Election campaign.

650: The number of seats in the House of Commons.

326: The finishing line. That would be enough for a government to vote through new laws without being defeated by their opponents. If they don’t reach that number we have got what is called a hung Parliament.

306: The number of seats won by David Cameron’s Conservative Party in the 2010 election.

258: The number of seats won by Gordon Brown’s Labour Party in the 2010 election.

57: The number of seats won by Nick Clegg’s Liberal Democrat Party in the 2010 election.

37: The number of days from the formal start of the campaign on 30 March to polling day on 7 May. This has been the longest official campaign in modern political history, easily beating the previous record of 26 days in 1987.

81: The number of opinion polls published during the campaign, as of May 5.

30: The number of polls showing the Conservatives in front.

37: The number of polls giving Labour a lead.

73: The number of constituencies visited by David Cameron over the course of the campaign.

53: The number of constituencies visited by Ed Miliband over the course of the campaign.

38: The number of constituencies visited by Nick Clegg over the course of the campaign.

12: The number of constituencies visited by Nigel Farage over the course of the campaign.

137: The number of seats visited by at least one of the main leaders.

37: The number of constituencies visited by two of the main leaders.

2: The number of constituencies visited by three of the main leaders... Leeds Central and the constituency of Cities of London and Westminster.

3,971: The total number of candidates standing in the election. This is 162 lower than the all-time high of 4,133 in 2010.

8: The number of BNP candidates standing in the election. In 2010 it was 388. The number of English Democrat candidates has also fallen, from 104 to 32.

37%: The proportion of Green Party candidates who are women. The Greens are fielding a greater proportion of female candidates than any of the other main parties. Ukip is fielding the smallest: just 12%.

72: The number of parties fielding just one candidate.

129: The number of seats visited by one or more of four main leaders, as of May 5. David Cameron has visited the most number of constituencies: a total of 68. Ed Miliband has visited 50 different seats, Nick Clegg has been to 35 and Nigel Farage has been to 12. A total of 32 seats have been visited by two leaders.

485,012: The number of people who registered to vote on April 20: the final day before the deadline.

15%: The estimated proportion of the electorate who have already voted by post.

4,658,499: The amount in pounds raised by Labour through donations during the campaign. The Conservatives’ raised £3,456,017, Ukip took in £1,614,312 and the Liberal Democrats £234,000.

18.3m: The combined TV audience for all of the live debates and interviews. An average of 6.7m people watched the debate on ITV between the seven main party leaders, while 4.3m tuned in for the opposition leaders’ debate on the BBC. The same number watched the BBC’s live edition of Question Time featuring David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, while 2.9m tuned in the live Q&A of Cameron and Miliband on Channel 4/Sky News.

0.2: The size in percentage points of the Tories’ lead over Labour in the Press Association’s poll of polls at the start of the campaign on March 30.

0.2: The size in percentage points of the Tories’ lead over Labour in the poll of polls on May 5.

72%: Predicted turn-out as predicted by Ipsos Mori.