Play takes rough with the smooth

WELLINGBOROUGH, The Castle theatre, Castle Way - pic of playwright Deborah Gearing, who is being commissioned to write a play called Well...rough,. with robert wharton from museum
WELLINGBOROUGH, The Castle theatre, Castle Way - pic of playwright Deborah Gearing, who is being commissioned to write a play called Well...rough,. with robert wharton from museum
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Have your say

I’d like to offer my congratulations to Deborah Gearing on her being commissioned to write a play which will detract attention from the issues that inspired the clever and thought-provoking graffiti to the road signs that welcome visitors and those passing through Wellingborough.

I’m sure the play will be lauded as a success, no matter how few people actually attend.

I know residents of the borough who regard The Castle as being a waste of council taxpayers’ funds and have declared they will never spend a shilling in it.

I disagree with them and have, on occasion, enjoyed watching plays performed both in one of the studios and also the main theatre. However, I don’t like living on an estate where people are scared to venture out after dark because the street lights have been switched off and where I have to venture further to buy affordable, quality clothes, and I think the residents of Wellingborough have seen enough mobile phone shops, charity shops, estate agents and empty shops to last a lifetime. Pubs are everywhere, except where they are needed on large estates such as Hemmingwell and Queensway.

We often read letters sent in to the ET that complain of dirty streets, fly-tipping and other anti-social behaviour, never mind the endless reporting of drug-dealing, house burglaries and murders that have occurred in recent years.

And competing for low-paid, mind-numbing jobs in warehouses that appear to prefer to employ immigrants who work for the agencies that paid for their flights, provide their accommodation and charge a fee for transporting them to and from work is soul destroying. Public transport is appallingly overcrowded, overpriced and uncomfortable, and in some areas non-existent.

I agree with Robert Wharton that anything that highlights the positive side of the borough is to be welcomed, but the inventiveness and creativity of the disaffected perpetrators of this graffiti, and the problems that I have mentioned, need to be addressed before Wellingborough will be anything other than, well, rough.                      

Alan Marston

Queensway,

Wellingborough