Organisers arrange for family of Corby’s ‘Cat in a Hat’ to be at festival she would have loved

Margo with friend Gemma at Flashpoint Festival last weekend
Margo with friend Gemma at Flashpoint Festival last weekend

The family of Corby’s ‘Cat in a Hat’ were guests at a festival they had hoped she would be well enough to attend with them.

Cat Anderson went to Flashpoint Festival at Rockingham Castle last year with her family and they were planning to be there again with free passes from the organisers.

Rab Anderson with daughter Cat

Rab Anderson with daughter Cat

They had great memories and were looking forward to making more with Cat there last weekend.

Sadly she lost her battle with a brain tumour last month, but her parents Rab and Margo were among more than 20 family and friends who still went along.

Cat’s dad Rab Anderson said: “Myself, wife Margo and two daughters attended the Flashpoint Festival as the guests of organiser Neil Butkeraitis from UK Events and Productions.

“It was a bitter sweet experience as we knew we had been the previous year with our eldest daughter Cat.

Flashpoint Festival at Rockingham Castle

Flashpoint Festival at Rockingham Castle

“She was seldom happier than when around live music.

“She would have loved the festival and some of the acts in particular.

“Despite our sadness we had a great time and congratulate everyone involved in organising such a great event.”

Cat, who was born in Glasgow, raised in Corby and lived in Uppingham until recently, was just 36 when she was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour in 2014.

She was known as ‘Cat in a Hat’ because of all the different hats she had and following her diagnosis, family and friends rallied round to support her as well as raise awareness and money for Brain Tumour Research.

Her dad has said they will continue raising awareness of brain tumours, and he added: “I believe that Cat’s spirit lives on and I believe that she gave us signs of that over the weekend.

“We will attend again next year and will make this event part of our memorial to Cat.”

According to Brain Tumour Research, brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer.

In the UK, about 16,000 people each year are diagnosed with a brain tumour.

Less than 20 per cent of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years.