Richard Oliff: The lesson is to expect the unexpected

The arrival of the Prince of Cambridge has further secured the line of succession, says Richard, but we should beware the unexpected. The Duke of Windsor chose not to be king and instead married divorcee Wallis Simpson
The arrival of the Prince of Cambridge has further secured the line of succession, says Richard, but we should beware the unexpected. The Duke of Windsor chose not to be king and instead married divorcee Wallis Simpson
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Things are not always as they seem: the history of our Royal family bears out that nothing should ever be taken for granted.

When James II came to the throne in 1685 he could never have imagined his reign would end with exile in France, being replaced following what was called the Glorious Revolution by first cousins William and Mary.

When George V died in 1936 no-one could have foretold that his successor, Edward VIII, would never be crowned.

As many in our country still celebrate the birth of a Royal prince, it is all too easy to ignore how the present reality has an uncanny way of guiding the future in the most unexpected of ways.

Will the Queen abdicate in favor of future generations? Would the Prince of Wales choose to be King Charles III?

Or would he forego in favor of a younger modern new Royal family in the shape of King William V, with a new Prince George in waiting? We simply don’t know.

We can only follow events as they are: the Queen will reign for the rest of her life and Prince Charles will succeed as ‘Defender of the Faiths’.

The Royal birth was just another feelgood event that followed a remarkable period of British success, celebration and even euphoria.

The Diamond Jubilee, and an amazing Olympic triumph, managed to ease the pain of economic meltdown and, if that wasn’t enough, two British riders came right out of left field to win the Tour de France, the Lions took rugby to Australia, Andy Murray dared to win Wimbledon and we’re not looking too shabby in this year’s Ashes series.

I would like to have seen the Prince of Cambridge given a more adventurous name, yet even the one given, George, reminds us that we have secured at least 100 years of future Kings and added further ‘down’ to our thick tog national identity security blanket.