Officers use spray-paint to highlight issue of dog fouling on Corby estate

Officers have been out on the Oakley Vale estate in Corby as part of a crackdown on dog fouling

Officers have been out on the Oakley Vale estate in Corby as part of a crackdown on dog fouling

Officers have been out armed with spray-paint as part of a crackdown on dog fouling in Corby.

Corby Council is supporting Keep Britain Tidy’s ‘We’re Watching You’ campaign by raising awareness and highlighting the importance of clearing up after your pet.

Officers kick-started this year’s dog fouling campaign in the Oakley Vale area by encouraging the minority of dog owners who do not clean up after their dog to do so while reminding others of the health risks which can be caused by leaving dog mess on the streets.

The ongoing campaign aims to get more people involved in taking a stand against dog fouling and persuade fellow residents to behave responsibly.

Officers from Corby Council’s environmental services team have been out to spray dog waste in the area in bright, stand-out colours to raise awareness about dog fouling and encourage irresponsible dog owners to change their ways.

They are using water-based, environmentally friendly spray and all dog fouling will be cleared away once the campaign has finished.

The issue will then be closely monitored following the event in the hope that the amount of dog waste left on the streets decreases.

Corby Council will be covering various areas of the borough so officers may be coming to your community soon.

A spokesman for Corby Council said: “It is only a small amount of dog owners who are irresponsible and don’t clean up behind their dogs and we want them to realise just what they are leaving behind in their community by visually highlighting it to them on the streets.

“We hope that this, along with the prize draw and posters around the area, will give those that don’t ‘bag it’ the incentive to start and those that already do, the chance to be rewarded for their actions.”

Since 2014, Corby Council has received 219 intelligence reports from residents, environmental officers and neighbourhood wardens.

These reports highlight community awareness and pride.

They are a tool which will be used to enforce the legislation through fixed penalty notices and reinforce public health awareness.

This can help with identification and increased patrolling of hotspot areas.

While out on patrol, officers will be giving those that they see picking up behind their dogs a ticket to enter them in to a prize draw with various prizes to be won.