Northamptonshire’s Air Ambulance service sees an increase in football call-outs at this time of year

The Warwickshire and Northamptonshire Air Ambulance at a call-out in Rothwell last year
The Warwickshire and Northamptonshire Air Ambulance at a call-out in Rothwell last year
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The county’s Air Ambulance service says it sees an increase in football-related injuries at this time of year.

While the Football League is taking a break for the summer, there is no such break across the fields, parks and school play grounds of the county – and as with any sport, people are bound to get injured at some point.

The Air Ambulance Service, which includes the Warwickshire and Northamptonshire Air Ambulance, says it’s at this time of year that the broken collar bones and neck injuries of rugby matches decrease, and instead the service sees an increase in football related call-outs.

Last May nine-year-old Adam Browlett was enjoying a kick-about with his friends when he fell awkwardly, breaking his femur.

A fractured femur is a serious injury that can lead to significant blood loss due to the close proximity to a major artery in the leg.

Adam’s mum, Tina, was distraught. She said: “Due to the severity of Adam’s pain the Air Ambulance was called as they carry doctors on board who can administer stronger pain relief.

“The helicopter arrived quickly and the crew kept Adam as comfortable as possible while they straightened his leg to reduce the bleeding before applying a splint.

“I’m so grateful to the Air Ambulance; you don’t fully appreciate exactly what they do until someone you know needs their help.”

A spokesperson for The Air Ambulance Service said: “Football can seem harmless enough but injuries such as Adam’s can be very serious and potentially life threatening due to the loss of blood that can occur.

“Sports injuries account for approximately nine per cent of all of our calls outs and it is vital to ensure that these casualties receive the pre hospital care they need and that they are quickly transported to the nearest specialist hospital.”