Man ‘lay dead as his home was burgled’

Thieves broke into a man's home and stole expensive watches and his bank card while he lay dead in his kitchen
Thieves broke into a man's home and stole expensive watches and his bank card while he lay dead in his kitchen
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Thieves broke into a man’s home and stole expensive watches and his bank card while he lay dead in his kitchen, an inquest was told.

The body of Graham Gibson, 65, was discovered at his home in New Street, Desborough, in June 2012.

A police officer found Mr Gibson’s body after breaking into his home when a postman raised the alarm.

A post-mortem examination showed Mr Gibson had died from cirrhosis of the liver but it emerged at his inquest, in Kettering last Thursday, that someone had broken into his home while his body lay undiscovered and had stolen a bank card, which was later used on a number of occasions.

This week, police said a man had been arrested on suspicion of burglary and was charged.

However, the Crown Prosection Service had eventually opted not to prosecute the case, saying there was insufficient evidence of burglary or other offences.

Speaking at the inquest, Mr Gibson’s daughter Theresa Percival, from Wootton, said how upsetting it had been to learn that someone had broken into her father’s home after his death.

She added: “He had some expensive watches and figurines which were missing from his home.

“It was upsetting to think that someone had stolen those things while he was still in the kitchen.”

The inquest heard that Mr Gibson had been a high-flying salesman and had been in the military police in his younger days. He was stationed in Borneo and Hong Kong among other places.

Later, he worked in a sales role in a pharmaceutical company and his family, which included his wife and a son as well as his daughter, lived in Saudi Arabia for a number of years.

He and his wife divorced and he re-married, before getting divorced again in 2009.

His daughter Theresa told the inquest her father had a long-standing problem with alcohol and in his later years she had spoken to him more and more rarely. She said she had begun to have less contact with him following his second divorce in 2009.

She added: “He liked to have a drink, and the more pressure he had in his job, the more he drank.”

It is not known when Mr Gibson died, but he had spoken to relatives on New Year’s Day in 2012 and the police officer who discovered his body said Christmas cards were still on display.

Coroner Anne Pember said: “Mr Gibson died of natural causes, which were alcohol-related.”