KGH is a leader in keyhole surgery

Kettering General Hospital's colorectal department is expanding the range of complex operations it can perform using laparoscopic 'keyhole' surgery techniques. One patient who has recently benefitted from the expansion is grandfather Bentham (64) from Hargrave, who had a bowel cancer and kidney cancer removed using the keyhole technique in a single 13-hour operation. Pictured with him are surgeons Mr Saleem El-Rabaa and Mr David Payne with Sister Sinead Wilson & Operating Department Practioner Karina Cox (right).

Kettering General Hospital's colorectal department is expanding the range of complex operations it can perform using laparoscopic 'keyhole' surgery techniques. One patient who has recently benefitted from the expansion is grandfather Bentham (64) from Hargrave, who had a bowel cancer and kidney cancer removed using the keyhole technique in a single 13-hour operation. Pictured with him are surgeons Mr Saleem El-Rabaa and Mr David Payne with Sister Sinead Wilson & Operating Department Practioner Karina Cox (right).

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Surgeons at Kettering General Hospital have performed a breakthrough keyhole surgery to help a man’s battle to beat cancer.

Brian Bentham, of East Hargrave, underwent 13 hours of major surgery to remove cancerous tissue from his bowel and kidney.

The procedure would normally have to be undertaken in two major operations which would leave the patient with two sizeable scars from incisions.

However, surgeons decided it was possible to be completed in just one keyhole surgery, meaning that Mr Bentham only has several tiny “pin-prick” size scars.

Mr Bentham said he was amazed at the procedure and how quickly he has recovered.

The 64-year-old said: “I found it hard to believe that they could do such a major procedure through keyhole.

“I left hospital in just one week, when it would have taken at least three weeks if I had had the two major operations. The hospital has been fantastic and been a great support through everything.”

Keyhole surgery is much less invasive than traditional open surgery and has a quicker recovery time with patients spending less time in hospital.

Saleem El-Rabaa, the hospital’s colorectal and general surgeon who operated on Mr Bentham, said: “I think this is the first procedure we have done on this level and complexity through keyhole surgery.

“We will look to do similar operations in the future if it is the correct procedure for the patient in question. It is certainly doable and is a big benefit if we find the right patient.”

Consultant urological surgeon David Payne, who was also part of the operation team, added: “This is a great example of doctors at Kettering General Hospital working together to improve care for patients.

“Keyhole surgery is becoming increasingly important and, where appropriate, we are doing our best to use it because of the benefits it has for patients.”

Mr Bentham will now continue his recovery, under going six months of chemotherapy to complete his treatment.