Kettering manslaughter trial: CCTV ‘supports punch claim’

The Euro Food Centre, outside of which Kamil Gumowski received fatal injuries
The Euro Food Centre, outside of which Kamil Gumowski received fatal injuries
0
Have your say

A man whose friend received fatal injuries on a night out in Kettering has been giving evidence at the trial of two men accused of his manslaughter.

Kamil Gumowski, 22, died after being knocked to the ground in an incident outside the Euro Food Centre in Silver Street in August 2013.

Kamil Gumowski, who died after being assaulted in Silver Street, Kettering, on Sunday, August 18.

Kamil Gumowski, who died after being assaulted in Silver Street, Kettering, on Sunday, August 18.

Marek Krukowski, 30, of Havelock Street, and Dominik Maryszak, 29, of Digby Street, deny manslaughter. Prosecutors say Krukowski caused Mr Gumowski to fall after punching him, while Maryszak encouraged and assisted him.

The jury at Northampton Crown Court heard from Mr Gumowski’s friend Marceli Heidrych, who was with Mr Gumowski when the incident occurred just after midnight on Sunday, August 18.

Mr Heidrych had earlier described the moment his friend hit the ground with what he described as a big force.

Cross-examining Mr Heidrych, Bozzie Sheffi, representing Krukowski, suggested Mr Gumowski might have fallen after a push from Maryszak instead. Maryszak denies that, saying any push he made would not have been powerful enough to have knocked Mr Gumowski over.

Ms Sheffi said to Mr Heidrych: “What I would suggest is this is what you saw: there was no punch from the man in the blue shirt (Krukowski). All that you could see was a very rapid movement happening at the same time as your friend Kamil is falling to the ground.”

But prosecution counsel Anwar Nashashibi later asked Mr Heidrich: “You have described a movement like that (a punch). You said that movement was very fast. Do you remember that punch happening, or not?”

Mr Heidrych replied: “It seems to me yes.”

He had also earlier given evidence that he had heard both defendants saying they would hit the victim.

But David Leathley, for Maryszak, asked the witness: “Can I suggest that standing outside the Polish shop the night Kamil died, you could not hear properly what you think (the two men) said to each other?”

The defence will also argue there might be some confusion as to the exact meaning of the defendants’ words in Polish when they are translated into English.

Also giving evidence for the prosecution was CCTV expert William Platts, who told the court that the slow shutter speed of the security camera outside the Euro Food Centre, which recorded at four frames per second, could explain why no blow to Mr Gumowski’s head was seen in the footage.

“It could have happened but not have physically been recorded on the CCTV,” he told the jury. “If it was a fast punch (the camera) wouldn’t catch it, or wouldn’t necessarily catch it. Because the movement was so fast and a blur, it’s not recorded as a moment in time.”

But Mr Platts also said: “(Mr Gumowski’s) body is in focus but the head has gone back so fast that it’s blurred.” He said his analysis supported the Crown’s view that Krukowski struck Mr Gumowski, adding: “It’s my analysis that Maryszak didn’t throw a punch.”

Cross-examining him, Mr Leathley asked: “Do you think anything Maryszak did was a significant cause of the injured party falling to the ground?”

Mr Platts said: “I don’t think so, no.”

The trial continues.