Hospice keeps on helping out hearts

Nurse manager Cathy Langtree, patient Laura Macloed and Lakelands fundraiser Paul Marlow
Nurse manager Cathy Langtree, patient Laura Macloed and Lakelands fundraiser Paul Marlow

A heart failure programme which helps people live with their condition and saves the NHS nearly £100,000 a year is celebrating its fifth anniversary.

The unique 16-week programme at Lakelands Hospice was set up to combat the high prevalence of heart conditions in Corby.

It costs £28,000 a year to run, but the hospice says it saved the NHS £93,000 between March 2011 and February 2012 due to reduced hospital admissions.

Some patients taking part in the programme have gone from two or three hospital admissions a year to one or none.

The programme is designed to educate patients how to control heart failure, while also offering social interaction, complementary therapies and entertainment.

And due to its success, it was expanded in August 2011 to include Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

Nurse manager Cathy Langtree said: “Corby has a red light for heart failure and COPD so this service is extremely beneficial for patients. It costs very little to run but saves the NHS a significant amount. And research has proved the long-term benefit from taking part in the programme.”

Fundraising manager Jodie Mutch said: “With funding it is always chicken and egg, but being independent enables us to respond to the needs of the community.

“Because cardiac disease is so prominent in Corby we were able to look at how we could help. It is an education programme in terms of how people can live with this condition, so they still have quality of life.”