Raising awareness of dementia

The first of a series of awareness workshops for Embracing National Dementia Week takes place at Moulton College.
The first of a series of awareness workshops for Embracing National Dementia Week takes place at Moulton College.

As part of National Dementia Week this week Sue Homer, networking co-ordinator for Home Instead Senior Care, writes for the Telegraph.

Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias lead to nerve cell death and tissue loss in the brain.

Over time, the brain shrinks dramatically, affecting nearly all of its functions.

This means your loved one may experience changes in memory, personality, relationships and abilities.

These changes can be among the hardest for families to face.

Two thirds of people with dementia are women.

One in three people over 65 will develop dementia.

Between the ages of 40 to 64 one in 1,400 will start to show first symptoms.

Between 65 and 69 one in 100 will suffer progressive symptoms.

From 70 to 79 one in 25 will suffer deteriorating symptoms.

One in six 80-year-olds and over will suffer distressing symptoms.

Symptoms to look out for include:

Struggling to remember recent events but easily recalling events from the past.

Finding hard to follow conversations or programmes on TV or radio.

Forgetting the name of friends or everyday objects.

Problems with thinking and reasoning.

Feeling anxious, depressed or angry about their forgetfulness.

A decline in the ability to talk, read or write.

There is help available:

Reduction in Council Tax of up to 100 per cent – subject to criteria for Alzheimer’s and dementia sufferers.

Please contact your local council for further information, or the The Alzheimer’s Society, 4 Alexandra Street, Kettering, on 01536 522752.

For a free informative 12-page booklet called Helping Families Cope please call Sue Homer on 01933 358708.