Karen on her marks to help athletes at London Olympics

Kettering General Hospital ward sister Karen Larmour has been chosen to be in the Olympic Stadium, inset, as part of the Field of Recovery team
Kettering General Hospital ward sister Karen Larmour has been chosen to be in the Olympic Stadium, inset, as part of the Field of Recovery team
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A hospital nurse picked to help injured athletes at the 2012 Olympics says she won’t be worried about treating stars such as Usain Bolt – because she does not know who he is.

Ward sister Karen Larmour, 42, said she was delighted after being chosen to be part of the medical team supporting competitors at the Olympic Stadium in London this summer.

The nurse at Kettering General Hospital won her place after failing to get spectator tickets last year.

Mrs Larmour said: “It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be at such a big sporting stage – I’m so looking forward to it.”

She added: “But don’t ask which athletes I like, because I don’t know any.

“At least it means I won’t be phased when treating them – they will just be a typical patient in my eyes.”

Mrs Larmour, who lives in Kettering, will spend 10 days in the field of play recovery team at the stadium some time between July 27 and August 12.

But she has not yet received a rota and does not know which days she will be working with the team.

The ward sister has worked at the hospital for 25 years, 11 of those spent as a nurse in the accident and emergency department.

She said: “I was on my lunch break and was reading a nursing magazine when I saw the advert for the role.

“I thought it sounded great and applied, I was chuffed when I heard back that I was in.”

Last August, Mrs Larmour joined a medical team supporting the crowd at a women’s beach volleyball tournment in London.

She said: “It is also a great chance to network with other health professionals in the country.

“I really enjoy it.”

Mrs Larmour’s children, Thomas, 11, and Charlotte, eight, were pleased to hear the news she was going to be at the Olympics. Her colleagues at the hospital were also happy for her and look forward to trying to spot her on television.

Healthcare assistant Sheena Kennedy said: “We’re delighted for her – she’ll do very well.”