Food waste collection is to start next month

New bins: Corby:  new food waste caddies which are being distributed to every house in Corby Borough for the new food waste recycling system. Natasha Bell (Education Officer) with the bins.'Tuesday 12th June 2012
New bins: Corby: new food waste caddies which are being distributed to every house in Corby Borough for the new food waste recycling system. Natasha Bell (Education Officer) with the bins.'Tuesday 12th June 2012

A new food waste collection service will start in Corby next month – and it will mean two more recycling bins.

Before the service is launched on Monday, July 2, the council is to deliver two new waste caddies to every property in the borough.

Residents will be given a small five-litre caddy to keep in their kitchen and a 23-litre caddy to be kept outside.

They will also receive a roll of corn starch liners to line the caddies and instructions on how to use them.

Corby Council’s lead member for environment, Cllr Peter McEwan, said: “Recycling is one of the council’s priorities and we are always thinking of new ways to ensure that everyday waste is disposed of in the correct manner.

“The introduction of the new food waste collection scheme will allow us to do this and we hope that residents will carry on working with us to allow us to process food waste in a cheaper and more environmentally friendly way.”

The caddies are being delivered in the next few weeks and anyone who has not received theirs by Friday, June 29, is asked to contact the council.

Food waste will be collected each week on residents’ normal bin collection day.

People are being asked to recycle all their waste food including raw and cooked meat, fish, fruit and vegetables, all diary products, bread, cakes and pastries, rice, pasta, uneaten food from plates, tea bags and coffee granules. Once collected, the food will be taken to a composting facility which produces agricultural grade compost for farmers.

Cllr McEwan said: “All people will need to do is place all of their food waste into the new kitchen caddy and transfer it to the kerbside caddy ready for collection.”

In the past financial year Corby Council sent more than 13,600 tons of household waste to the landfill site in Weldon. The amount is the equivalent to the weight of 6,732 Hackney cabs.

It says research shows that 41 per cent of waste thrown away in black bins is food which could have been recycled.

The aim of the scheme is to reduce the amount of food that ends up in landfill, where it generates methane, a greenhouse gas that is 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide and contributes to climate change.

The council says the new scheme will also reduce odours caused by rotting food waste and will ensure black bins, used for general household waste, will stay cleaner.

Lisa Cunningham, of Scarborough Walk, Corby, said: “Food recycling is a great idea but I’m worried I won’t have room for all the bins.”

Sarah Hamill, of Cooper Crescent, Corby, said: “I don’t know where I’m going to put the indoor waste caddy, but it’s good to recycle.

Her mum, Mary Hamill, of Culross Walk, Corby, said: “I live in a flat and don’t fancy running up and down stairs each day to empty a small bin into the large food bin.”