Firefighters play snakes and ladders at Wicksteed Park in Kettering

Crew manager Rob Berwick ascends the rope tunnel
Crew manager Rob Berwick ascends the rope tunnel

Wicksteed Park has marked the opening of its latest attraction by completing the world’s biggest game of snakes and ladders, where sliding down a snake involved braving an eight-metre vertical dropslide.

The game was played by fire crews from Kettering to mark the launch of the park’s new Snakes & Ladders attraction, with players having to climb real life ladders each time they landed on the appropriate square.

Kettering Firefighters play the largest Snakes and Ladders game in the world at Wicksteed Park in Kettering. Firefighter Jill Garne, firefighter James Moore, watch manager Mark Britton and crew manager Rob Berwick

Kettering Firefighters play the largest Snakes and Ladders game in the world at Wicksteed Park in Kettering. Firefighter Jill Garne, firefighter James Moore, watch manager Mark Britton and crew manager Rob Berwick

The Snakes & Ladders attraction, which is housed inside a 40ft high building, comprises ladders, wooden tunnels and ramps to give adventurers of all ages the chance to make their way to the top in a variety of different ways before braving the freefall slide.

Wicksteed Park managing director Alasdair McNee said: “The aim of the park is to encourage children to get out of the house and show them that there is a world of fun and adventure out there.

“So what better way to do that than to experience the thrill of going up a ladder or sliding down a snake.

“The excitement of climbing or the trepidation of shooting down the giant dropslide is exactly the kind of natural children’s play Charles Wicksteed wanted to encourage.

Sophie Wright and Harriet Wells, both 10, at the top of the dropslide

Sophie Wright and Harriet Wells, both 10, at the top of the dropslide

“To have local firemen here to complete the world’s biggest game of snakes and ladders was great and hopefully all the climbing through the tunnels and up the ladders as well as sliding down the dropslide was good training for the job they do protecting local people and saving lives.”