Seal of approval for Kettering school’s £1m extension

Builder Rob King opens the extension

Builder Rob King opens the extension

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Pupils have given a huge thumbs-up to a new extension at Brambleside Primary School which was officially opened at the start of the new school year.

The construction work at the Kettering school was completed during the summer holiday, marking the end of an 18 month project.

The extension features three new classrooms, more office space and an addition to the school’s main hall.

Brambleside business manager Lisa Barratt, who managed the project, said pupils were very excited, especially as they had been involved with the project from an early stage.

She added: “We started the early work with the architects and county council about 18 months ago, but the actual building work started in February this year.

“The children were able to get involved as the site manager Rob King ordered them some hi-vis jackets so they could go onto the site and the school newspaper interviewed him.

“We invited Rob back for the formal opening and everyone involved was thanked.”

The numbers game

Brambleside Primary School was asked by education bosses to take on 60 pupils a year from the current academic year onwards, where previously it accepted 45.

The increased number means the school will grow from 315 pupils to 420 over the next few years.

The extension at Brambleside Primary School cost about £1m.

Most of this money was spent on the construction work while some was also spent on refurbishing two existing classrooms at the school.

Prior to the extension opening, pupils at Brambleside were taught in mixed age groups.

However, business manager Lisa Barratt said the new classroom space means all pupils will now be taught in same-age classes.

She added: “This process isn’t complete yet but it will be in the near future.”

Pupils were unable to use two classrooms during the construction.

Mrs Barratt said: “The pupils were taught in rooms like the ICT suite, where they would not normally be taught, but they coped very well.”