DNA-test dog mess, says councillor

Cllr Michael Brown during a campaign against dog mess he ran in 2011
Cllr Michael Brown during a campaign against dog mess he ran in 2011

A councillor has written to the Government to suggest dog mess in the streets is DNA-tested to trace owners who do not clean up after thier pets.

Cllr Michael Brown, who serves the All Saints ward on Kettering council, has written to Lord De Mauley, a Parliamentary Under-Secretary at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Cllr Brown says he thinks DNA samples should be taken from dogs when they are microchipped, allowing the authorities to determine which animals’ mess is not picked up by their owners.

In the letter, he said: “This would very quickly, I feel, change the culture amongst some dog owners who feel they do not need to pick up the mess.”

Cllr Brown also said the issue had been raised at every ward surgery he holds, adding it was a problem which had no easy solution.

The letter, which followed a recent Government announcement introducing compulsory micro chipping of pet dogs, said: “Some areas of my ward are littered in dog mess by a disrespectful minority of dog owners who do not feel the need to clean up after their pets. The main routes to and from the local schools can in one evening become very difficult to walk down without nearly stepping in some mess, despite regular street cleansing.

“This is something that has been raised at every single ward surgery I have held and continues to be a problem which has no easy solution.

“The majority of my residents who own a pet dog are extremely respectful. They look after their animals in a loving and proper way as well as respecting their community by cleaning up the mess that dogs sometimes leave in inappropriate places such as pavements and public parks.

“The problem public authorities find with dog mess is that unless you witness the act it is hard to prosecute, and putting a warden on every street corner 24/7 is an unrealistic prospect.

“I feel the new policy could go a step further. As in some other countries, when the dogs are micro chipped a DNA sample could be taken and stored on a database. This would allow local authorities to test mess on pavements and in parks and link it to a registered dog.

“This would very quickly, I feel, change the culture amongst some dog owners who feel they do not need to pick up the mess.

“I ask you to consider this proposal as I feel it will be the most effective way to deal with the problem.”