Desborough mum’s breast cancer awareness message

From left, Natasha Goodman and her daughter and Bella, two, present the cheque to breast care nurses Sophie Ferry and Pippa Kilcoyne, consultant onco-plastic Surgeon Salam Musa and breast care matron Annie Jasper
From left, Natasha Goodman and her daughter and Bella, two, present the cheque to breast care nurses Sophie Ferry and Pippa Kilcoyne, consultant onco-plastic Surgeon Salam Musa and breast care matron Annie Jasper

A breast cancer patient who has raised money for the Kettering General Hospital unit where she was treated is encouraging younger women to check themselves for the disease.

Today (Monday, November 13) Natasha Goodman, 38, of Desborough, presented a cheque for £2,000 to her surgeon, Dr Salam Musa, and members of the KGH breast service team.

Natasha actually raised £4,000 at a charity ball held at The Ritz, in Desborough, on October 14, and half has gone to KGH and the other half to the Breast Cancer Now charity which she also supports.

Mrs Goodman, who is married to Richard, and has two children, also Richard, eight, and Isabella, two, said: “I first had breast cancer aged 31 in 2011 and I was successfully treated for the disease.

“Unfortunately it came back and in April this year I had to have a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. I am now recovering well.  

“Since 2011 I have been trying to raise awareness of the fact that breast cancer isn’t something which just affects ‘older ladies’, it can also affect you when you are young.

“Therefore I am always looking for ways to raise awareness of this and to get younger people to take lumps and bumps seriously and get themselves checked out.”

Natasha also wanted to say a particular thank you to the KGH team.

She said: “I can’t express just how thankful I am to all of the breast care team. Everyone has been absolutely fantastic.”

KGH consultant onco-plastic surgeon Salam Musa said: “It is important for younger women to understand the value of breast self-examination and also – if you have a history of breast cancer in the family – having that risk assessed.

“If you are at higher risk you will be offered earlier screening than the national programme which offers screening every three years to women aged 50 to 70.

“We very much want to thank Natasha for her support for the unit.

“Her donation will help us to improve our service and make the care and the journey of patients with breast cancer easier and more effective.”