Desborough couple successfully give birth two years after tragically losing daughter to Group B Strep

Baby Theo.

Baby Theo.

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A Desborough couple have praised Kettering General Hospital after successfully giving birth two years after losing their daughter to a relatively unknown infection.

Amanda Barnes and Jason Osborne’s daughter Mia died shortly after being born after catching an infection from the Group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteria present in her mother.

Amanda Barnes and Jason Osborne

Amanda Barnes and Jason Osborne

They campaigned to raise awareness of the infection, which is present in one in four pregnant women, and Amanda has now given birth to a healthy boy called Theo.

Mr Osborne said: “We’re overwhelmed to have Theo who was born weighing 8lb 11oz and is perfectly healthy.

“So many things at the hospital have changed in a positive way and for that we must praise them.

“There are posters everywhere about Strep B now that weren’t there before and people are told about it at scans.

Jason's sons Charlie (9) and Regan (11) who have helped with the #GBSAware and #WhyGuess campaigns for GBS Support.

Jason's sons Charlie (9) and Regan (11) who have helped with the #GBSAware and #WhyGuess campaigns for GBS Support.

“All we wanted is a happy outcome and we were confident in Kettering General Hospital that GBS would not be problem this time.

“They treated us like royalty.”

The new parents are continuing to raise awareness of the infection, and believe that every couple should be given the chance to test for it.

The most sensitive and accurate test (the ECM test) when purchased privately costs £35, with results expected within two days.

Mr Osborne added: “I’m now an ambassador for the Group B Strep Support charity and we’ve held some quite heavily attended awareness events.

“GBS can come and go and it’s important that we make sure families know about it, because as we saw with Mia the worst can happen.

“I’m currently engaged with local MPs on the subject of Group B Strep awareness and testing and prevention strategies and the topic is gaining momentum.

“All we hope for is that healthcare professionals make pregnant couples aware of the infection, how to test privately for it and the dangers of not doing so - it could save their child’s life.”

To find out more about the GBS charity, click here.

To sign a petition to raise awareness of the infection, click here.