Rushden burglar’s jail sentence increased after appeal fails

Karl Michael Rayner, 39, of Park Road, Rushden, burgled three homes, tried to break into two others and stole two cars, all in a matter of hours

Karl Michael Rayner, 39, of Park Road, Rushden, burgled three homes, tried to break into two others and stole two cars, all in a matter of hours

  • Criminal burgled three homes, tried to break into two others and stole two cars, all on same night
  • He was jailed for four years in 2014 but appealed against the length of sentence
  • Ordered to serve an extra 28 days for wasting court’s time
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A burglar from Rushden has had his sentence increased after mounting an appeal with “no merit whatsoever”.

Karl Michael Rayner, 39, of Park Road, Rushden, burgled three homes, tried to break into two others and stole two cars, all in a matter of hours.

In our judgment, the overall sentence was richly deserved

Lord Justice Burnett

He was jailed for four years at Northampton Crown Court last January after he was convicted of three burglaries, two attempted burglaries, two thefts of a motor vehicle and one count of driving while disqualified.

Three senior judges at London’s Appeal Court rejected Rayner’s sentence challenge, and ordered that he serve an extra month behind bars for pursuing an appeal which had “no merit whatsoever”.

Lord Justice Burnett said Rayner left the bedsit where he lived in the early hours of July 14, 2013, before carrying out the series of offences.

He broke into two nearby homes.

He stole car keys from one property and made off with the homeowner’s Volkswagen Golf.

Rayner crashed the car in a ditch in Wymington soon after, before forcing his way into another home in the village.

In Podington he burgled yet another property and took a Saab car from the driveway.

Rayner’s home was later searched and police discovered a watch he had taken during the spree.

Days later, police found the keys to the Saab in a house where Rayner was arrested.

He told officers that he was not involved in the break-ins, blaming others, and later claimed at his trial that he had been at a friend’s house at the time.

On appeal, Rayner argued that his sentence was too long.

But Lord Justice Burnett, sitting with Mr Justice Gilbart and Judge Richard Griffith-Jones, said: “In our judgment, the overall sentence was richly deserved.

“There are some who might consider it on the light side.”

The judge also rejected an application for Rayner to appeal his convictions, and said: “We have concluded that both the applications have no merit whatsoever.”

He said Rayner pursued his appeal despite being warned it had no prospect of success.

For wasting the court’s time, Rayner was ordered to serve an extra 28 days before he would be considered for release.