Corby school draws up plan to improve

St Brendan's Primary School is taking action to improve after Ofsted inspectors found elements of the school were inadequate

St Brendan's Primary School is taking action to improve after Ofsted inspectors found elements of the school were inadequate

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A school is taking action to improve after Ofsted inspectors found the achievement of pupils, quality of teaching and leadership and management were all inadequate.

They say special measures are required at St Brendan’s Primary School, in Beanfield Avenue, which was inspected in March.

Parents attended a meeting at the school last week to discuss the Ofsted report and what action is being taken to address concerns raised by inspectors. Another meeting is planned for June.

The inspector’s report says the behaviour and safety of pupils needs improvement.

It goes on: “This is a school that requires special measures. Pupils do not make enough progress in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 6.

“Attainment gaps between pupils, for who the school receives additional Government funding, and other groups are widening. Support for disabled pupils, and those who have special educational needs, is too variable.

“Teaching over time is inadequate. Until recently, teachers did not have accurate information on pupils’ attainment and progress, in particular the most able, to help them set work at the right level to challenge pupils.”

The report outlined the school’s strengths, which include giving reception classes and Year 1 a good start and the care given to pupils.

Inspectors said children treat each other with respect and that St Brendan’s promotes pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development well.

The last time the school was inspected by Ofsted in 2011 it was rated good.

The recent inspector’s report said pupils’ behaviour needs to improve because they lose concentration and become distracted in lessons when the work is too easy.

It went on: “The school has declined since the last inspection; leaders and governors have not demonstrated the capacity to improve teaching and pupils’ achievement.

“The school’s checks on how well it is doing have not been accurate enough to identify clearly where improvements are needed.”

Inspectors attended 20 classes at the school which has 310 pupils aged four to 11.

In a letter to parents on the school’s website, acting headteacher Leanne Brydon says: “Please be assured that parents will be kept fully informed of developments and there will be regular communication on the progress that the school is making on key actions.”