Corby man who lost family members to brain tumours issues marathon appeal

Team Toby Page - Andrew Rose, Toby Page and Kristen Dowie.
Team Toby Page - Andrew Rose, Toby Page and Kristen Dowie.

A Corby man who lost two family members to brain tumours has urged people to run for a charity which tackles the illness.

Toby Page, 40, from Danesholme, has lost his brother-in-law and wife’s uncle to brain tumours, inspiring him to take on the Great North Run in 2015 and 2016 for Brain Tumour Research.

Not only did his training regime help him lose 10-and-a-half stone in weight, but he also, along with two friends who ran with him this year, raised about £3,500.

The sum is more than enough to sponsor a day of research at one of Brain Tumour Research’s Centres of Excellence, which costs £1m per year.

Now Mr Page is urging runners who have secured a place in the 2017 London Marathon to consider running to raise money for the charity.

He said: “Just 20 per cent of brain tumour patients survive five years.

“My brother-in-law, Philip Macleod, died a year after diagnosis with a Grade 4 glioblastoma multiforme brain tumour (GBM4) and my wife’s uncle, Ian Phoenix, survived two years after his diagnosis.

“They were both Corby men who, following surgery, underwent radiotherapy treatment at Northampton General Hospital. Ian was best man at Philip’s wedding.

“It’s a sad fact that brain tumours can affect anyone at any time but no-one knows what causes them.

“Treatments for patients are very limited. I hope that people will help us change this by running the 2017 marathon for Brain Tumour Research.”

The charity already 40 runners signed up to support them at the race on April 23.

Carol Robertson, community fundraising manager for Brain Tumour Research, said: “For too long, brain tumours have been a neglected cancer.

“Stories like Toby’s family’s remind us all that we cannot allow this desperate situation to continue.

“We are appealing for runners to nominate us as their chosen charity for 2017 and make a difference. Together we will find a cure.”

To find out more about how to support the charity contact community fundraising manager Carol Robertson here.