Corby care home boss guilty of neglect

The former manager of a care home which left a Corby man bed-bound for six months appeared in court on Monday where he was sentenced for wilful neglect
The former manager of a care home which left a Corby man bed-bound for six months appeared in court on Monday where he was sentenced for wilful neglect
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The former manager of a care home which left a Corby man bed-bound for six months appeared in court on Monday where he was sentenced for wilful neglect.

Archibald Hogg died in July 2012 at the age of 87 after spending the last six months of his life largely confined to a bed at Seagrave House in Occupation Road, Corby, because a manual handling survey was never carried out for him, or proper equipment bought to allow him to sit unaided.

In court on Monday, the home’s former boss, Stuart Smithers, 40, of Fleckney in Leicestershire, was handed an eight-month suspended prison sentence and ordered to complete a 220-hour community punishment.

The court was told how Mr Hogg had moved into the home after his daughter Lynne Bennett had been impressed after carrying out research.

However, in a witness impact statement read out in court, she described the decision as the “worst in her life”.

She added: “Mr Smithers said I should put my trust in him – but that was the worst thing I did. My fight to get dad the care he deserved began soon after.”

The court was told how Mr Hogg, who suffered from severe dementia and required help for almost all his daily needs, required a hoist to be removed from his bed and a special chair to sit in. These were never purchased despite repeated requests.

Additionally, Mrs Bennett said she often found her dad lying in his own excrement and urine and added that he lost a severe amount of weight in his six months at Seagrave.

Mrs Bennett said Smithers was initially sympathetic and helpful, but his attitude changed after the home received warnings from healthcare professionals about the treatment of Mr Hogg.

In court on Monday, defence barrister Nick De Freitas said Smithers’ career in the care home industry had been ruined and he now worked for the minimum wage in a warehouse.

Speaking after the sentencing, Mr Hogg’s son Ron Hogg said he was satisfied with the sentence.